Being an Artist

There are many advantages to being an artist – one is certainly being able to create visually what you would like to see in this world. Though it takes time, you can always hone your art form or hobby, with patience and practice to be able to craft what you want to see made. Sometimes this is something that no one else is doing, no one else is crafting, something that one else has thought of. So, you yourself have to fill in this void.

This is actually how a lot of great things got there start and how countless more will find their way too.

But being an artist is like any other job, it has its perks and it has its disadvantages. One of the major perks sets it aside from most other professions and hobbies, or at least ones that I’ve always been fond of, is that being an artist is being able to do a little of everything. We get to try a taste of everything, get to learn some of this, dabble in a little of that and at the end of the day pick and choose what we take. Not necessarily “how”, but most certainly “what”.

As an artist you learn to see the world around you in a completely different way, somehow appreciating it more. And unless you were born with a paintbrush in hand, you’ll probably spend some serious time learning, studying paintings, drawings and other art – and most certainly your subjects.

I remember as a child, I was always given a pencil, crayons and paper – generally to keep me busy at group functions and gatherings, but it was something that I enjoyed doing. While modest, the pencil, crayons and simple printer paper still form the basis of nearly everyone’s artistic careers. Some just get bigger and more expensive toys – others learn to make what they started with work for them, improving on it.

My Artistic Career started when I saw my parents drawing something for me to try to copy, as I would imagine a lot of kids paths begin. When you first start to draw or paint, your picture may not look like their’s – or even close for that matter. But you knew that it was fun and you want another go – and when that happens you start to see how they did it and begin to dissect it. And this is where the magic begins, where we first start learning, in picking apart what has been put before us. Not critics eyes, no. Just curious eyes.

Maybe your next plane doesn’t look like the one that your parents drew either, so you feverishly go back and erase it or grab a fresh piece of paper when your experiments start covering up the sheet that you had and try again. In doing so, studying their drawing, you see the general shape, the feel, which helps. Then you start again, drawing the wings and end up with something that more resembles taffy on a hot day than that sleek, vintage world war two era mustang that your dad drew.

But this isn’t a problem. Its learning. And it takes time.

We realize that our wings don’t look like theirs and wonder why. So, going back over them, realizing that they are shaped differently, like elongated water drops. Then you may ask why exactly their shaped like that, which would take you down another long avenue, sparking a whole different conversation. But one that would undoubtably help in drawing that aircraft that we were after. By simply wanting to learn how to draw a plane, even as a child, you can start to figure out what makes that plane fly and why, what makes it stay up in the air and not just fall straight down like an African Sparrow carrying a Coconut – which in turn only makes your art that much the better.

While sometimes we may want something to not look conventional, go out on a limb, say Dali or M.C. Escher as examples. While both of those people drew utterly bizarre and remarkable things – they were firmly rooted in some sort of world, generally ours to some extent or other, even if one that made little to no sense. Salvador Dali with his abstract clocks and creatures from other worlds, they still bore some logic, if unorthodox. His clocks just melted rather than told time. As for Escher – his illustrations merely defied the laws of physics and architecture – but still somehow in the end made a certain bizarre sense to the eyes. Both of these men knew the world, what it looked liked – and that gave them the ability to change it upon the canvas and art across the world.

You learn by observing, other’s work as well as your own. Its how we as artists get better. We ask questions so we learn. So to do we observe. Humans are after all a very visual creature, we like to see what we’re doing.

And the best part, whether you think that you’re the greatest that ever walked or just a humble person with a pen and paper, someone who just likes to dabble or who spends countless hours on just one project, whether you sell thousands of designs or just do a drawing for your childs amusement – everyone can be an artist. Everyone puts that hat on sometime in their life regardless of if they ever make a cent doing it. All it takes is a little time and effort to keep that hat on.

There are many more prints coming out soon! The above, Art is Messy, will soon be available in the shop. Till then, you can check out all of our other available prints here!

We’ve also got a page on Deviant Art as well now, so you can go join in the art and follow along there as well!

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